Angus Armstrong's picture
Affiliation: 
National Institute of Economic and Social Research
Credentials: 
Director of Macroeconomic Research
Visiting Professor, Imperial College London

Voting history

A “new” UK industrial strategy ?

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Question 2: Do you agree that the UK needs a new regional policy?

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Answer:
Strongly agree
Confidence level:
Extremely confident
Comment:
For many reasons, not least the legitimacy of our external policy and the integrity of the union. Obvioulsy this needs to be evidence based. I do not think that tax subsidies are necessarily the best way. But productivity levels and trends have become so divergent as long as London suffers some degree of slowdown then there is no obvious area which can offset this. This requires a real rethink of poliyc. For example, identifiable public expenditure is greater in London and the South than the North and how do we include our public support for tertiary education across the UK. Can we have technology only graduate schools in the North? Or chemical science in Teeside rather than London.

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Question 1: Do you agree that the UK needs a new industrial policy?

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Answer:
Strongly agree
Confidence level:
Very confident
Comment:
This should combine a strong element of regional policy. Output (GVA) per wokforce shows enormous variation accross the UK and understanding the challenges in the low productivity areas would be an obvious way to raise national productivity. This should be complemented by tertiary education policy and the regions.

The Future of Central Bank Independence

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Question 3: More generally, do you agree that it is desirable to maintain central bank independence? Again focus on the near future, say next 48 months.

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Answer:
Strongly agree
Confidence level:
Confident
Comment:
I agree with the need to maintain central bank independence but over a narrow remit. This solves a clear coordiantion problem. I think it would be a retrograde step to erode this position. However, I do not think the Bank should be the only advocate of financial stability policies, our FSB contributions or expect a free ride over its position on the European debate, fiscal policy or many other issues the Bank gets involved with. These are inherently political.

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Question 2: Do you agree that the traditional argument that less central bank independence leads to higher inflation will (still) be relevant over the next 48 months in Western economies?

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Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Confident
Comment:
I do not see why the proposition will not continue to be true in the next four years.

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Question 1: Do you agree that central bank independence in the Eurozone and the UK will decline over the next 48 months?

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Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Not confident
Comment:
I do not expect an explicit change in the governance of central banks. However, since independence is granted by governments I expect that there may be some further acquiescence to government discussions, involvement and pressures. This could be significant if the politicians promises to those 'left behind' prove difficult to deliver by conventional fiscal means.

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