Gianluca Benigno's picture
Affiliation: 
London School of Economics
Credentials: 
Associate Professor in Economics

Voting history

Deal or no deal: The Greece standoff

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Question 3: Do you agree that implementation of the agreement will lead to an expected decrease in Greek debt repayments?

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Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Confident

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Question 2: Do you agree that Greece would be better off defaulting right now rather than signing to the agreement under consideration?

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Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Confident
Comment:
I think that at current debt to GDP ratio and given the economic situation, restructuring is the only way to go

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Question 1:  

Do you agree that, on balance, the implementation of the agreement as outlined in media reports will have a non-trivial negative effect on Greek GDP?

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Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Confident
Comment:
Previous agreements as in the past five years have shown to be unsuccessful in addressing the Greek situation as debt to GDP ratio has increased rather than stabilizing and there has been a sharp contraction in economic activity with higher unemployment.This one does not look that different.

The Importance of Elections for UK Economic Activity

Question 2: Do you agree that the outcome of the general election will have non-trivial consequences for aggregate economic activity (employment and GDP)?

Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Confident

Question 1: Do you agree that the austerity policies of the coalition government have had a positive effect on aggregate economic activity (employment and GDP) in the UK?

Answer:
Disagree
Confidence level:
Not confident
Comment:
it is hard to disentangle the effects of an individual policy measure. The coalition government run a fiscal contraction in 2010 and 2011 and then reduced the pace of the fiscal contraction from 2012. The reduction in the pace of the contraction, along with expansionary monetary policy and international factors that have kept interest rates low in the UK, could explain the recent recovery of the UK economy and its better relative performance.

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