Jonathan Portes's picture
Affiliation: 
KIng's College, London
Credentials: 
Professor of Econoics and Public Policy

Voting history

Migration and the UK economy August 2014

Question 1: Do you agree that migration to the UK can be expected to be beneficial for the average income of current UK inhabitants in the upcoming decade?

Answer:
Strongly Agree
Confidence level:
Extremely confident
Comment:
Immigrants to the UK, both from within and outside the EU, are more likely to be of working age than current UK inhabitants and are more likely to have higher skills and qualifications. As a result, spillover effects and complementarities mean that immigration is likely to result in higher productivity for both new and existing workers and hence higher incomes. [See Rienzo (2013) http://niesr.ac.uk/publications/migration-and-productivity-employers%E2%80%99-practices-public-attitudes-and-statistical ]. In addition, since recent immigrants have a more positive fiscal balance than natives, migration will have a positive impact on native welfare (natives will see lower taxes or higher public service spending for a given deficit/GDP path).

UK House Prices and Macro-Prudential Policy July 2014

===========================

Question 2: When housing-related risk is deemed excessive from the viewpoint of financial stability, do you agree that the correct response is to deploy macro-prudential tools, leaving interest rates focused on the needs of inflation and aggregate real activity?

 
Answer:
Strongly Agree
Confidence level:
Very confident
Comment:
Macroprudential tools are largely untested in the UK. However, it is clear interest rates alone are far from an ideal instrument to deal with housing-related risk; and there are good reasons on empirical and theoretical grounds to prefer macroprudential instruments.

===========================

Question 1: Do you agree it is time for more robust policy action to prevent a build-up of excessive housing-related risk?

 

 
Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Not confident
Comment:
The UK housing market is clearly a source of structural problems in the UK economy: now is no exception. However, it is very difficult to assess at any one time whether it is genuinely a macroeconomic problem, and if so what to do about it.

Economic Consequences of an Independent Scotland June 2014

Question 2

Assuming that Scotland becomes an independent country, do you agree that the UK government's position of ruling out a monetary union is in the economic interests of the continuing UK? 

Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Very confident
Comment:
Ruling out a monetary union would probably have some costs in terms of trade and reduced economic integration with Scotland. However, the downside risks of a poorly structured or managed monetary union are sufficiently great to justify incurring these relatively small (for the continuing UK) upfront costs.

Question 1

Do you agree that that Scotland would better off in economic terms as an independent country?

Answer:
Disagree
Confidence level:
Confident
Comment:
An independent Scotland, if economic policy were broadly sensible, would probably be slightly worse off than as part of the UK; if both lucky and well managed, it might be slightly better off. However, the downside risks (both exogeneous and arising from the quality of policy making) are quite large.

Pages