Joseph Pearlman's picture
Affiliation: 
City University London
Credentials: 
Professor of Economics

Voting history

Are academic economists ‘in touch’ with voters and politicians?

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Question 1: Do you agree that the economics profession needs an institutional change that promotes the ability to communicate more effectively with policy-makers and the public at large and to make clear when economists have a united view; and do you agree that we need to introduce leadership to help achieve this improvement through coordinated efforts?

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Answer:
Strongly agree
Confidence level:
Very confident

Brexit: the potential of a financial catastrophe and long-term consequences for the UK financial sector

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Question 2: What is the probability that the UK experiences such a significant disruption to financial markets and asset prices following a vote for Brexit on 23 June?

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Answer:
31-70%
Confidence level:
Very confident
Comment:
A drop in house prices is likely to be a good thing in London. As regards commercial property, there was so little disruption since the financial crisis compared to what many in that market were expecting, that I would be completely amazed to see major disruption after Brexit.

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Question 1: Do you agree that there would be substantial negative long-term consequences for the UK financial sector if the UK were to leave the EU?

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Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Confident
Comment:
While I agree with notion of 'passporting rights', I am only reasonably confident that this argument is important. Both sides of the argument have been over-hyped, and I do not find myself completely convinced of the weakness of the Brexit case.

The future role of (un)conventional unconventional monetary policy

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Question 2:  Do you agree that central banks should operationalise the use of these alternative tools of unconventional monetary policy for use either in the near term, or in the future, as economic conditions warrant?

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Answer:
Disagree
Confidence level:
Very confident
Comment:
Negative interest rates might politically jeopardise the existence of an independent central bank. Fiscal policy should be decided independently of the central bank; any joint decision with the central bank will interfere with its independence.

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Question 1: Do you agree that central banks should continue to use the unconventional tools of monetary policy deployed in response to the global financial crisis as part of monetary policy under normal economic conditions?

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Answer:
Strongly agree
Confidence level:
Confident
Comment:
Policymakers should use all instruments at their disposal.

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