Martin Ellison's picture
Affiliation: 
University of Oxford
Credentials: 
Professor of economics

Voting history

National Living Wage and the UK economy

====================================================================

Question 1: Do you agree that the new National Living Wage is likely to lead to significantly lower employment?

====================================================================

Answer:
Disagree
Confidence level:
Confident

Brexit and financial market volatility

======================================================================

Question 2: Do you agree that the possibility of Brexit significantly increases uncertainty and volatility in financial markets and the economy in general?

======================================================================

Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Not confident
Comment:
It’s difficult to ignore all the theory which predicts that the possibility of Brexit should increase uncertainty. We see it in the exchange rate data, where six-month implied volatility of sterling is at a four-year high, but so far other markets seem less affected. It’s important to separate uncertainty from volatility – they don’t necessarily go hand-in-hand as there can be a lot of uncertainty but if that uncertainty doesn’t matter for markets then there will be no impact on volatility.

======================================================================

Question 1: The value of the pound fell sharply this week. Do you agree that the public debate on Brexit can be expected to (continue to) lead to a substantially higher level of exchange rate volatility in the upcoming months?

======================================================================

Answer:
Disagree
Confidence level:
Not confident
Comment:
Most economists see exchange rates as random walks reacting to news. The question then is whether we expect a steady flow of news that will be significant enough for markets to react. The conclusion of negotiations between David Cameron and the EU was big news, as was the decision of Boris Johnson to come out in favour of Brexit, hence the exchange rate reacted. The only equally large event on the horizon is probably the referendum result itself, so I wouldn’t expect to see particularly large exchange rate movements before then. Most likely the pound will remain weakened or gradually regain its losses without drama, but forecasting future news is impossible.

Market Turbulence and Growth Prospects

======================================================================

Question 2: Do you agree that the falls in share prices, low oil prices and the slowdown in some emerging market economies will have a significant negative impact on the UK’s economic recovery?

======================================================================

Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Confident
Comment:
The UK is a mild net importer of hydrocarbons, so the fall in oil price should be marginally beneficial. Any possible positive effect of ultra-low oil prices is unfortunately likely to be dominated by growing risks in choppy world financial markets.

======================================================================

Question 1: Do you agree that economic growth prospects for the global economy have seriously deteriorated?

======================================================================

Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Confident
Comment:
The ultra-low oil price reflects weakening demand and concerns about instability in oil supply as Saudi Arabia and other countries vie for influence in global energy markets. None of this is good news for growth in the global economy. Prospects are further weakened by turbulence in stock markets and a rise in uncertainty (the VIX has been climbing steadily since the start of the year).

Pages