Michael Wickens's picture
Affiliation: 
Cardiff Business School & University of York
Credentials: 
Professor of economics

Voting history

Secular Stagnation

Question 1: Do you agree- making your own definition of secular stagnation clear if you disagree with that offered here- that it is more likely than not that the advanced Western economies have entered into a period of secular stagnation?

Answer:
Disagree
Confidence level:
Confident
Comment:
The US and the UK are growing again and so aren't stagnating. Eurozone countries are stagnating due to the constraints imposed by being in a currency union.

Migration and the UK economy August 2014

Question 2: Do you agree that current government policies with respect to non-EU migration (including policies on students, skilled workers, and family migration) are effective in maximizing the gains to the economy from migration while minimizing any possible negative impact to specific groups?

Answer:
Strongly Disagree
Confidence level:
Extremely confident
Comment:
The issue is social rather than economic. Large parts of the UK are becoming unrecognisable as a result of many years of lax migration policies and low cultural assimilation due to multi-culturalism. Priority should be given to the highly skilled. Assimilation is essential.

Question 1: Do you agree that migration to the UK can be expected to be beneficial for the average income of current UK inhabitants in the upcoming decade?

Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Confident
Comment:
Migration that is in response to demand will increase both GDP and GDP per capita, but otherwise migration is likely to raise GDP but reduce GDP per capita and the average wage, especially in the medium term. Migration from the EU reflects its greater wage rigidity than the UK and hence the UK's greater ability to absorb increases in labour supply. More important for the UK than the average wage is the reduced standard of living due to much increased pressure on public services,benefits, the demand for housing and concreting over the countryside.

UK House Prices and Macro-Prudential Policy July 2014

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Question 2: When housing-related risk is deemed excessive from the viewpoint of financial stability, do you agree that the correct response is to deploy macro-prudential tools, leaving interest rates focused on the needs of inflation and aggregate real activity?

 
Answer:
Strongly Disagree
Confidence level:
Very confident
Comment:
The demand for housing is affected by the cost of borrowing and the availability of credit. The former can be affected by interest rates and the latter by macro prudential policy. Therefore both financial tools are relevant. Moreover, housing is a major channel through which conventional monetary policy works.

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Question 1: Do you agree it is time for more robust policy action to prevent a build-up of excessive housing-related risk?

 

 
Answer:
Agree
Confidence level:
Very confident
Comment:
There are several risks in current policy. One risk is excessive house-price inflation in the South East, but less elsewhere at present. Another is creating the conditions of the US sub-prime crisis by encouraging borrowing on the cheap that is not sustainable when, as expected, interest rates are raised before long.

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