Richard Portes's picture
Affiliation: 
London Business School and CEPR

Voting history

The future role of (un)conventional unconventional monetary policy

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Question 2:  Do you agree that central banks should operationalise the use of these alternative tools of unconventional monetary policy for use either in the near term, or in the future, as economic conditions warrant?

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Answer:
Strongly agree
Confidence level:
Extremely confident

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Question 1: Do you agree that central banks should continue to use the unconventional tools of monetary policy deployed in response to the global financial crisis as part of monetary policy under normal economic conditions?

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Answer:
Strongly agree
Confidence level:
Extremely confident

National Living Wage and the UK economy

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Question 2: Do you agree that the new NLW will have a muted effect on wages and prices?

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Answer:
Strongly agree
Confidence level:
Extremely confident

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Question 1: Do you agree that the new National Living Wage is likely to lead to significantly lower employment?

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Answer:
Disagree
Confidence level:
Very confident

Brexit and financial market volatility

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Question 2: Do you agree that the possibility of Brexit significantly increases uncertainty and volatility in financial markets and the economy in general?

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Answer:
Strongly Agree
Confidence level:
Very confident
Comment:
If the perceived likelihood of Brexit were to rise, then uncertainty in the economy and in the financial markets must rise. Even the proponents of Brexit have no clear view of what would happen - indeed, of what they would like to see happen, in regard to our subsequent relationship with the EU - after a vote to leave. And views on the likely outcome of negotiations diverge widely. How much this would affect volatilities of asset prices is another question - I'd say some, but I wouldn't expect volatility spikes of the degree we saw in the financial crisis.

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